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Pac-man outduels Bradley

Photo by Al applerose

Photo by Al Applerose

Manny Pacquiao wasn’t about to take any chances this time around when he faced Timothy Bradley Jr. at the MGM Grand Garden Arena.
In front of 15,601 spectators on Saturday, Pacquiao came out dedicated, aggressive, determined and dominated the action as he reclaimed the World Boxing Organization welterweight belt, which he lost to Bradley in June 2012 on a controversial split decision.
Pacquiao wanted to finish rounds strong and make a lasting impression on the three judges. He did just that as Glenn Trowbridge (118-110), Craig Metcalfe (116-112) and Michael Pernick (116-112) all voted in his favor.
In fact, Pacquiao claimed the final seven rounds on Trowbridge’s card, and took six of the last seven rounds on Metcalfe’s and Pernick’s cards.
“I didn’t want to get careless,” said Pacquiao, who raised his record to 56-5-2 with 38 knockouts. “I picked up more steam in the second half. I made the adjustments Freddie [Roach] gave me in the corner.”
Coming into the fight, Roach, a six-time Trainer of the Year, hoped Pacquiao would end it with a knockout and dispel the notion that, according to Bradley, he lacked a killer instinct.
“He wants to prove to the world that he has the killer instinct,” Roach said prior to the highly-anticipated rematch. “He motivated Manny this time. I told him to knock them out early and then you won’t have to worry about that.”
If Pacquiao was trying for a knockout, something that hasn’t happened since he dropped Ricky Hatton in May 2009 with a crushing left hook in the second round, or six months later when Miguel Cotto was stopped in the 12th round, was still sharp as he landed repeatedly with the left hand and scored with combinations.
Nonetheless, Bradley was duly impressed by the Filipino congressman. “Pacquiao was the better man tonight, and he showed what he’s made of,” he said. “One of the reasons why I love Pacquiao so much is he never ducks an opponent.”
The fight seemed to change momentum after the sixth round when Pacquiao really went to work offensively against the heavily-muscled Bradley, who was coming off a split decision victory over Juan Manuel Marquez in October 2013.
In that fight Bradley out-boxed the Mexican counter-puncher, rocked him in the 10th round and staggered him in the 12th round.
Seven months earlier Bradley was involved in a slugfest with Ruslan Provodnikov, who floored Bradley in the first round [ruled a slip], and then scored heavily in the second round before losing a unanimous decision.
Bradley, a two-division world champ, tasted defeat for the first time in 32 professional bouts with 12 knockouts, and was willing to match punch-for-punch with the eight-division king.
But when it became apparent that Bradley was trailing on the judges’ scorecards, he opted to try for the knockout which never came.
Bradley said Pacquiao is still one of the best in the business, and is always looking for challenges.
“He’s always willing to face the best and he faced one of the best tonight,” Bradley said. “He came out on top and that’s why he’s so great.”
Indeed, and for one night Pacquiao was his old self and is still one of the best pound-for-pound boxers in the world.
 
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Posted by on April 18, 2014 in Articles by Rick Assad

 

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Undercard is lively

Vasquez
Some boxers are head-hunters, while others prefer to attack the body. This was the case when Bryan Vasquez faced heavy-hitting Jose Felix Jr. in a World Boxing Association interim super-featherweight title bout on the Timothy Bradley/Manny Pacquiao undercard at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on Saturday.
While Vasquez was landing body shots, Felix, who was accidentally headed-butted twice, preferred to work upstairs for a knockout, but in the end Vasquez connected with the more effective shots and grabbed a unanimous decision.
Vasquez won the first three rounds, but Felix had a better fourth, especially toward the latter portion of the round.
The pace slowed somewhat in the fifth round before picking up steam in the sixth as Vasquez, who was nailed three times below the belt, came on strong.
Felix (26-1-1 with 21 KO’s) was head-butted in the seventh round as Vasquez (33-1-0 with 17 KO’s) was in charge.
The eighth was close, however the ninth round saw Felix actually attempt to kick Vasquez, which prompted Referee Robert Byrd to deduct a point from the native of Mexico.
Meanwhile, Vasquez, who hails from Costa Rica, took the 10th round, while Vasquez continued his domination in the 11th round after landing two good right hands late. In that round Felix was once again head-butted.
The final round belonged to Vasquez, who controlled the action after connecting with multiple rights and lefts which continued a pattern established early in the fight.
Jessie Vargas took to task replacement Khabib Allakhverdiev and claimed the WBA junior-welterweight belt and International Boxing Organization junior-welterweight title with a unanimous decision.
Vargas began strong then slowed down a bit over the dozen rounds, and made excellent use of the jab.
Vargas (24-0-0 with nine KO’s) won the first round while Allakhverdiev picked up the second round, but Vargas’ use of the jab gave him the nod in the third round.
The fourth round was fairly even, while Allakhverdiev (19-1-1 with nine KO’s) garnered the first half of the fifth round, whereas Vargas was better over the last minute or so.
The sixth round was full of back-and-forth action which was sustained over much of the second half of the fight.
Vargas clearly won the seventh and ninth rounds, while Allakhverdiev, from Russia, also had his moment in the sun as the pair exchanged shots in the eighth.
The final four rounds saw the pair trade shots, but most of the time Beltran came out on top, and each was effective in the 12th round.
Raymundo Beltran (29-6-1 with 17 KO’s) had the better of Arash Usmanee (20-2-1 with 10 KO’s) across a dozen rounds in their North American Boxing Organization lightweight title mix and earned a unanimous decision.
From the opening bell, Beltran came out and set the tone as he made superb use of the jab, and also employed a steady head-and-body attack.
Beltran owned the first six rounds, while Usmanee, from Afghanistan but resides in Montreal, Canada, did some damage in the seventh, but Beltran rallied in the eighth round as he attacked the head and body.
Beltran claimed the ninth and 10th rounds, while the 11th was fairly uneventful. Usmanee had a good 12th round as he located the target with three right hands, but Beltran still took the round.
 
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Posted by on April 18, 2014 in Articles by Rick Assad

 
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Interview with Al Bernstein

Al Bernstein talks about his favorite fights Jose Luis Castillo versus Diego Corrales l, Hagler vs Hearns as well as Larry Holmes against Ken Norton and more.

 
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Posted by on April 16, 2014 in Professional Boxing

 

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Interview with Larry Merchant

Larry Merchant talks about his favorite fight of all times as well as his favorite fighter as well as Pacquiao Bradley rematch

 
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Posted by on April 15, 2014 in Professional Boxing

 

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Interview with Max Kellerman

Max Kellerman explains why Jose Luis Castillo vs, Diego Corrales l is his favorite fight of all times and more including break down of Pacquiao Bradley rematch.

 
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Posted by on April 14, 2014 in Professional Boxing

 

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Pacquiao beats Bradley and settles the controversy

IGORSTOY - paqs

Manny Pacquiao promised more aggressiveness. Timothy Bradley promised a knock out. Charged crowd at the MGM’s Garden Arena waited to see who will deliver on Saturday night. Would the rematch settle the score and put to rest the controversy of their first encounter? They both tried to deliver on their promises. Bradley went for a knock out which might have been a tactical mistake and Pacquiao delivered on aggressiveness. At the final bell Pacquiao emerged a clear cut winner with all three judges scoring the fight for Pilipino fighter, 116-112 twice and 118-110. Pacquiao reclaimed his WBO welterweight title and a rightful place amongst boxing elite. “ I am very happy tonight,” exclaimed Pacquiao in a post-fight interview with Max Kellerman:” because the victory is ours.”

 

Neither fighter delivered in the first, mostly tactical round. Action heated up in rounds two and three with Pacquiao landing clean shots to the head and Bradley concentrating on the body. Bradley stunned Pacquiao for the first time in the fourth round with clean right hand. It was significant and somewhat of a turning point in a fight because it demonstrated that Bradley could hurt his opponent and was surprisingly a stronger man in the contest. From that point on Bradley was swinging for the fences looking for a knock out and Pacquiao settled into his fight, moving in and out and firing fluid combinations. Fifth round was uneventful, but Pacquiao seemed to be more of an aggressor in the sixth. Pacquiao dominated round seventh trapping Bradley on the ropes and landing eight unanswered blows and finishing the round wobbling Bradley’s head as if he was a rag doll. Pacquiao controlled the action in rounds eight and nine. Bradley lost his balance twice in the ninth round, one looked like a knock down. Referee Kenny Bayless called them both a slip, but it did seem like Bradley’s balance was messed up. Pacquiao unleashed a furious attack and took control of the fight in the tenth stanza. Bradley was reduced to trying to land big punch. Eleventh round was close where Bradley did some effective countering, but in the twelfth Pacquiao hurt Bradley and made him bold for dear life.
This time there was no controversy. “ You can’t say nothing about Manny,” said Bradley in a post-fight interview:” I lost to one of the best fighters in the world.”

 
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Posted by on April 14, 2014 in Professional Boxing

 

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Bradley promises win

Image
Photo by Ray Flores
Timothy Bradley Jr.’s split decision victory over Manny Pacquiao in their World Boxing Organization welterweight title fight in June, 2012, was satisfying, but fraught with controversy.
That’s because the vast majority of ringsiders at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas believed Pacquiao won the bout, but Judges C.J. Ross and Duane Ford oddly sided with Bradley, 115-113, while Jerry Roth had Pacquiao ahead, 115-113.
At Bradley’s media day last Thursday at the Justin Fortune Gym in Hollywood, the 30-year-old said he hopes to erase any doubt when the two square off this Saturday at the same venue.
“I know he doesn’t want to be in the ring with me,” said Bradley, who has a record of 31-0-0 with 12 knockouts and is a two-division world champion. “He knows I’m going to knock him out.”
Bradley realizes the gravity of this mega-bout. “This is the most important fight for me,” he said. “This is the fight of all fights. This is going to be an intense fight. I could end my career after this fight.”
But will there be added pressure on Bradley because of the seemingly strange scoring? “I don’t have anything to prove,” he said flatly. “The pressure’s on him. It’s not on me.”
In the first fight, Pacquiao seemed to get the better of Bradley in the early stages, often outworking him by landing clean left hands that put the Filipino superstar ahead on all three scorecards after four rounds.
A few maintain that the Pac-Man wasn’t as dominant in the middle and latter rounds, perhaps taking off the final minute rather than finishing strong which is his custom.
In reality it was a case of Bradley connecting with many little punches, and appearing more active, while Pacquiao found the target with the stronger blows.
Bradley knows Pacquiao will want to reverse this trend and come out aggressive from the opening bell.
“His back is against the wall,” said Bradley. “I didn’t know Pac-Man before. I’m better prepared. I’ve been in with him before. I know what to expect. I’m a better boxer and I’ve already beaten him once.”
Bradley looked fight-ready. “I’m on weight right now,” he said. “Weight is not a problem. I’ve trained hard for this fight.”
Being in tip-top shape will be crucial for Bradley. “I’m expecting the best Manny Pacquiao. I’m a lot smarter now. I’m one of the best fighters pound-for-pound in the world.”
Pacquiao’s trainer is the Hall of Famer Freddie Roach, who thinks his charge took the first bout. In so many words Bradley has indicated that Pacquiao lacks the killer instinct, which Roach said isn’t the case.
In Pacquiao’s last fight against the always-tough Brandon Rios in November, 2013, in China, the Filipino legend walked away with a unanimous decision, and was even awarded a shutout on Judge Michael Pernick’s scorecard, 120-108, and will be scoring Saturday’s clash.
“We didn’t want to take any chances like the [Juan Manuel] Marquez fight against Rios,” said Roach. “He beat Rios badly. He won every round.”
In that clash versus Marquez, Pacquiao, an eight-division world champ, was in front on all three judges’ cards, but then got careless and was knocked out in the sixth round.
With regard to the killer instinct, Roach said Pacquiao hasn’t lost it. “He [Bradley] really woke Manny up,” he said. “He woke up the monster and we thank him for that.”
 
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Posted by on April 9, 2014 in Articles by Rick Assad

 

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